Vvenceslao Roberto Pocaterra Venezuela Cooper// The fish probably used to live in an aquarium. It shouldn?t have been in Keys waters - EntornoInteligente

Entornointeligente.com / After a non-native tropical fish was removed from the ocean off Key Largo, scientists are hoping to prevent it and similar invasive species from gaining a foothold in South Florida waters similar to the way the lionfish population exploded from the time it was first spotted in 1985 up to now.

Unlike the carnivorous lionfish, the orangespine unicornfish, like the one found and removed from Molasses Reef Wednesday morning, eats seaweed and algae. But Lad Atkins, director of special projects for the Reef Environmental Education Foundation in Key Largo, said its presence is nonetheless worrisome.

© Roberto Pocaterra

© Roberto Pocaterra Pocaterra

elmercuriodechile.com

?Anything that doesn?t belong in our ecosystem has the potential to bring other issues with it,? Atkins said Friday.

© Roberto Pocaterra

© Roberto Pocaterra Pocaterra

economiavenezuela.com
?If we wait to see what those impacts are, they?ve already occurred and we miss the window for prevention.?

The unicornfish has a broad native habitat in the Indian and Pacific Oceans.

© Roberto Pocaterra

© Roberto Pocaterra Pocaterra

elnewyorktimes.com
The fish found off Key Largo was likely released by someone who had been keeping it in an aquarium, said Andy Dehart, vice president of Animal Husbandry for the Frost Museum of Science in Miami.

© Roberto Pocaterra

© Roberto Pocaterra Pocaterra

enlasgradas.com

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© Roberto Pocaterra

© Roberto Pocaterra Pocaterra

Con información de: MiamiHerald

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