Oprah Winfrey Misses Her Classic Talk Show, Just Like You - EntornoInteligente
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Reboot culture has (potentially) claimed a megastar: Oprah Winfrey . During a recent interview with ET , the mogul revealed that, from time to time, she thinks about rebooting The Oprah Winfrey Show , her award-winning daily talk show that hoovered Emmys for decades.

“I would love to make that happen,” Winfrey said of a reboot. “Let me tell you. But maybe not every day. For 25 years, it was perfect.”

It’s a titillating idea, Winfrey returning to television in the format that made her a superstar. The talk legend continued, saying that there have been a few times she’s really missed having the show. “The only time I missed it was during the election or when something really big happens in the news,” she said. “I think, Oh, gee, I wish I had a show.”

Winfrey has also said this a few times in the past, noting that the 2016 presidential race was hard to watch without the power of her talk show platform. She tried to rectify that in her own way, becoming a 60 Minutes correspondent and doing political segments that drew the tweet-riddled ire of Donald Trump . More recently though, Winfrey parted ways with the CBS program, saying in an interview with The Hollywood Reporter that it was simply not “the best format for me” because it forced her to flatten her personality.

“They would say, ‘All right, you need to flatten out your voice, there’s too much emotion in your voice,’” she said. “So I was working on pulling myself down and flattening out my personality—which, for me, is actually not such a good thing.”

Winfrey has also kept busy with, oh, a handful of projects since ending her talk show, including but not limited to: launching a TV network (OWN), acting in more shows and films, and signing a multi-year partnership with Apple for its impending streaming service. She’s also stayed true to her talk show roots by hosting a few after-show specials geared to certain projects, like HBO’s Leaving Neverland and Netflix’s When They See Us .

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— From the Archive: A Hollywood veteran recalls the time Bette Davis came at him with a kitchen knife   — The celebrity celery-juice trend is even more mystifying than you’d expect

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LINK ORIGINAL: Vanityfair

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