Boeing Max cleared for takeoff, two years after deadly crashes » EntornoInteligente

Boeing Max cleared for takeoff, two years after deadly crashes

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Entornointeligente.com /

A total of 346 passengers and crew members on both planes were killed

After nearly two years and a pair of deadly crashes, the US Federal Aviation Administration has cleared Boeing’s 737 Max for flight.

The nation’s air safety agency announced the move early Wednesday, saying it was done after a “comprehensive and methodical” 20-month review process.

Regulators around the world grounded the Max in March 2019, after the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines jet.

That happened less than five months after another Max flown by Indonesia’s Lion Air plunged into the Java Sea.

A total of 346 passengers and crew members on both planes were killed.

Federal Aviation Administration chief Stephen Dickson signed an order Wednesday rescinding the grounding.

US airlines will fly the Max once Boeing updates critical software and computers and pilots receive training in flight simulators.

The FAA says the order was made in cooperation with air safety regulators worldwide.

The move follows exhaustive congressional hearings on the crashes that led to criticism of the FAA for lax oversight and Boeing for rushing to implement a new software system that put profits over safety and ultimately led to the firing of its CEO.

Investigators focused on anti-stall software that Boeing had devised to counter the plane’s tendency to tilt nose-up because of the size and placement of the engines.

That software pushed the nose down repeatedly on both planes that crashed, overcoming the pilots’ struggles to regain control.

In each case, a single faulty sensor triggered the nose-down pitch.

The new software now requires inputs from two sensors to activate the software, which Boeing says does not override pilot controls like it did in the past.

The company changed the software so it doesn’t repeatedly point the nose of the plane down to counteract possible aerodynamic stalling.

On a conference call with reporters, Dickson said the Max is now the most scrutinised transport aircraft in history, with over 40 FAA employees working tens of thousands of hours on the plane.

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